Thursday, April 24, 2014

Water Kefir: My Family's New Favourite Drink!


It's been one of my goals for the last year or so to add more fermented/probiotic foods to my family's diet. Of course, homemade yogurt (with all its beneficial bacteria) has been a regular part of our diet for many years. And I use a good-quality, raw, organic apple cider vinegar for all of our salad dressings.

Given all the benefits of eating fermented foods, I would really like us to be having 1-2 servings per day.  And of course, making them myself is a much cheaper option than buying ready-made ones! I'd tried my hand at fermented lemons and sauerkraut last spring but that experiment didn't end well and I got frustrated and gave up for a while.

Several months went by. Okay, okay, it was basically a year! And then all of a sudden I started seeing a lot of references to water kefir popping up all over the place and I got curious. I read a bit about it, but was feeling skeptical. Probiotic? Yes. Delicious? I thought not (my initial response to the concept was more along the lines of "eeew, that sounds gross!").

Then one day my friend Anita happened to mention that she was looking to rehome some of her water kefir grains as she was getting overrun with them and I thought "what the heck - I'll give it a whirl". Although I wasn't yet convinced I was going to actually enjoy it, I thought I should at least give it a try because as far as fermented foods go, it's supposed to be one of the easiest to have success with, and it's also really inexpensive to make.

As it turns out, water kefir's a lot more pleasant than I expected. The thing that really gives it great potential is that after it has done its initial ferment for 48 hours or so, you can do a "second ferment" where you remove the kefir grains and add fruit or juice to the water kefir (in the photo above, the jar on the left is in the middle of its second ferment, the jar on the right is doing its first ferment). When sealed with a tight lid, you end up with a pleasantly fizzy beverage after another couple of days.

I have been doing the second ferment with lemon juice and fresh, chopped ginger (juice of one lemon and about 1 tablespoon of ginger to a quart of water kefir). I can't tell you how happily surprised I am by how fantastic it is! It tastes like a homemade lemony gingerale and is incredibly refreshing. My whole family loves it to the point where there might be some arguing about who got more of a particular batch :) I'm so fond of it that I already get upset by the idea of not having some around, and I only started making it a couple of weeks ago!

While there is a small amount of maintenance to making water kefir, it's a few minutes every 2-3 days and in my opinion it's totally worth the effort. Aside from the water kefir grains (which you can probably get by asking around to see if anyone in your area has some to spare), the only other supplies you will need are white sugar and some quart Mason jars, plus whatever you want to add to flavour the water kefir for the second ferment.

If you're interested in trying to make your own water kefir, I'd recommend checking out this video from Cultures for Health, along with their instructions on how to flavour water kefir. 

Have you tried water kefir? Do you have a favourite way to flavour it? 

Mountain Rose Herbs. A herbs, health and harmony c 
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Monday, March 31, 2014

Weekly Menu Retrospective #129


Welcome to my weekly roundup of the past week's eats. I prefer to report what we ate in the last week, rather than what we're planning to eat in the coming week. Why? The reason is pretty simple: although I usually have a general idea of what we're going to eat in the next week or so, life often unfolds a little differently than planned, and I adjust my menu plan on a near-daily basis to accommodate leftovers and other not-possible-to-plan-ahead circumstances. I find this is the easiest way to ensure that I minimize our family's food waste. I'm also willing to admit that I'm a rather spontaneous cook, given to preparing foods that strike me as the most appealing thing to eat right here and now!

If you'd like a whole book full of inexpensive, quick and kid-approved recipes, check out my book, Cheap Appétit : The Complete Guide to Feeding Your Family for Less Than $400 a Month (While Eating Better Than You Ever Thought Possible) on Amazon (Amazon.com, Amazon.ca and Amazon UK) and Barnes and Noble.  It's gotten multiple 5 star reviews!! I've included page references to recipes that are in the book in my menu plans so you can locate them quickly. For more details about the book, go here. 

 
Breakfasts:

Granola (p. 92) with homemade yogurt, Blueberry Streusel Muffins (sub blueberries for rhubarb in the recipe on p. 97), French toast, scrambled eggs and toast 

Lunches: 

leftovers, sandwiches, Toad-in-the-Hole (p. 180)

Dinners:
Monday: Everything-But-the-Kitchen-Sink Lentil Soup (p.162), cornbread (p.212)

Tuesday: Sausage & Vegetable Coconut Curry (variation of this recipe, p. 136)

Wednesday: Lemon & Garlic Chicken (p. 184), Easy Oven Fries (p. 194), Creamy Cucumber Salad (p. 205)

Thursday: Spinach & Mozzarella Egg Puff  (p. 181) 

Friday: Taco Platters 
  
Saturday: Grilled cheese sandwiches, sliced veggies and fruit (we were at my Dad's wedding for the afternoon and not very hungry after everything we ate there!)

Sunday: Roast chicken, mashed potatoes, gravy, roasted carrots, Peanut Butter & Jam Blondies
 
In keeping with my local and organic challenge, I'd also like to note the local and/or organic items on this week's menu:

Organic: coconut (in granola), coconut oil, coconut milk, raisins, sunflower and pumpkin seeds (in granola), flax seeds, tortilla chips, fresh ginger, garlic, lemons, coffee (locally roasted and delivered by bike!), tamari, oregano, basil, parsley, Fairytale tea, peppermint tea, lemon balm, oatstraw

Local: potatoes, onions, carrots, apples, cucumbers, salsa (home-canned), honey (unpasteurized), sour cream, whole wheat flour, sausage and ground beef (antibiotic and hormone free, pastured), milk
 
Local AND organic: 
oats, cornmeal, milk, eggs (not "certified organic", but real free range and fed organic feed), apple cider vinegar

Want to know more about the specific food products I use and where I buy them? Check out my "What's In My Pantry" board on Pinterest.  I will keep this board updated with current information on what products we use, where we're buying them, and how much we're paying. It's a work-in-progress, and you can find it HERE.

For more great meal ideas, check out Menu Plan Monday at orgjunkie.com. 
Mountain Rose Herbs. A herbs, health and harmony c 
Love what you read here? Click HERE to see the ways you can help support this blog (many of them won't cost you a thing!) 

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Wednesday, March 26, 2014

Rising Food Prices *DON'T* Have to Mean an Increase in Your Grocery Bill!


In the last 3 years or so I have seen many, many articles in the newspapers and online discussing the rising costs of food. Depending on which sources you look at, there are reports of staple food items like milk, bread and eggs increasing by up to 69% in the past two years alone.

Reading statistics like this can cause a lot of anxiety, if, like many of us these days, there's not a lot of flexibility in your food budget. And most of these articles leave you feeling like there's little you can do to cope with rising food costs except try to funnel more of your monthly budget towards them. Here's the interesting thing, though - the weekly cost per person to feed our family hasn't increased in 20 years.

Yes, you read that right. 20 years. 

Back when I was in graduate school in the early-to-mid 90's, my husband and I spent on average about $50 per week on groceries for the 2 of us, or $25 per person.

Currently, we average right around $100 per week for our family of four, or, yes, *still* $25 per person. And that's with 14 and 16 year old boys who are pretty much perpetual eating machines. Also, while we don't buy exclusively organic, we do regularly buy a number of organic foods, compared to 20 years ago when we didn't buy any at all.

If food costs have gone up so much in just the past couple of years, how on earth is it possible that we're still spending the same amount per person as we did 20 years ago?!?

There are a lot of reasons for this. One of them would be that while our food expenditures were certainly modest 20 years ago, we weren't the hard core uber-frugal food shoppers we are today.

The other major reason that our average per-person cost hasn't changed in 20 years is that there are a LOT of things you can do to help decrease your food expenditures, and most of them have been routine for us for many years.

7 Things You Can Do To Keep Your Grocery Bill From Rising

1. Make sure you're buying foods on sale at their rock-bottom prices.
While the *regular* prices of many foods has increased significantly, interestingly, the rock-bottom sale price has not risen nearly as much. Stockpiling foods when they go on sale at their rock-bottom prices has always been a big part of our savings strategy, and it's helped insulate us from rising costs.

2. Ditch unnecessary (and mostly unhealthy) extras.
If you're feeling really pinched, now is the time to stop buying pop, chips and other high-cost, low- nutrient foods. You may want to rethink cold cereals as well - in my opinion you're not getting very much nutrition for the high price (there are plenty of other things to eat for breakfast - try homemade granola or muffins, toasted homemade bread with peanut butter, leftover cornbread, French toast, oatmeal or eggs just to name a few!)

3. Decrease your food waste
The average North American family throws out 25% of the food they buy. This is heartbreaking for many reasons, but when every food dollar counts you need to get this number as close to zero as possible. Eat leftovers as soon as possible, and regularly assess fresh foods so you can freeze them before they spoil if necessary. Store and rotate bulk-purchased foods properly so you'll use them up before they go bad.

4. Buy in bulk
Buying staple foods in large quantities often leads to big savings (up to 50% or more). Some of the items we buy in 10-15 kg quantities are flours, oats, cornmeal, rice, coconut and raisins. We also buy 30 lb boxes of ground beef from a local supplier at an incredible price!

5. Seek out alternative food sources
This one often happens naturally when starting to buy more bulk foods. If you're used to shopping at one or two stores for all your food needs, there's a good chance you can be getting much better prices on some things elsewhere. No one store (even a discount store) has the best prices on everything! Combining this strategy of purchasing food from a variety of sources plus the previous strategy of buying in bulk means you can achieve significant savings *without* having to spend more time grocery shopping.
 
6. Make friends with low-cost, high-nutrient foods
I don't think it will be a surprise to anyone that beans are at the top of that list, but they don't have to be considered a punishment :) There are plenty of delicious meals that star this frugal food staple; try Chickpeas with Potatoes & Peas, Spicy Black Bean Bake, West African Style Baked Beans or Sausage and Lentil Stew, which stretches 2 sausages to feed 4 people! Carrots, green peas, eggs and sunflower seeds are a few other great examples of high-nutrient budget-stretching foods.

7. Build your skills
Making as many foods from scratch as possible will shave lots of dollars off your food bill. Learn to make your own bread and yogurt (no special equipment required!) or grow some of your own food (you can even swap some of it with your neighbours). None of these is particularly difficult or time-consuming, especially once you've mastered the basics.

Yes, these are all basic principles of feeding your family well on a tight budget. At a time when so many families are struggling with their food expenditures, more and more people need to learn these strategies. So, if all of these suggestions are "old news" to you, please pass them on to someone else you know who would be grateful to learn these concepts. And if most of these ideas are new to you, you may find my book, Cheap Appétit: The Complete Guide to Feeding Your Family for Less Than $400 a Month (While Eating Better Than You Ever Thought Possible) to be a valuable resource!
Mountain Rose Herbs. A herbs, health and harmony c 
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Thursday, March 6, 2014

RECIPE: Green Pea & Lettuce Soup with Lemon Oregano French Toast Sticks


Even though the temperatures are still well below zero, I'm starting to crave spring greens in a big way - asparagus season just cannot get here soon enough as far as I'm concerned!

While it's going to be a while yet before I'm biting into a satisfyingly crunchy stalk of sauteed asparagus, I decided a green soup would be in order since it would both fulfill my craving for more greens *and* help keep me warm.

This simple soup is extremely quick and easy to make, and has a pleasant, mild flavour that even the kids should love (if you can convince them to try a spoonful of very green liquid!)

Serving Lemon Oregano French Toast on the side should help win over any reluctant family members. This was my first foray into a more savoury French toast and now I can't believe I never tried it before - it's wonderfully fragrant as it cooks up!

Ingredients:
2 tbsp butter
1 onion, chopped
1 head mild leaf lettuce (such as Bibb or Boston), thoroughly washed and coarsely chopped
2 cups chicken or vegetable stock
2 cups frozen peas
¼ cup light cream
1 tsp salt
½ tsp pepper

3 eggs
3 tbsp milk
juice of ½ a lemon
1 tsp dried oregano (or use 1 tbsp minced fresh oregano if you have some on hand)
a pinch of salt
6 thick slices of bread
1-2 tbsp butter for frying

Instructions:
  • In a large saucepan, melt butter over medium heat. Add onion and cook until tender. Add lettuce and cook just until wilted.
  • Add stock and peas and simmer over medium heat for about 10 minutes.
  • Blend in small batches in blender until smooth (*carefully* as hot liquid has a tendency to spurt!)
  • Return to saucepan and add cream, salt and pepper. Heat over medium-low heat until hot.
Now it's time to make the French toast sticks:
  • In a wide, shallow bowl combine the eggs, milk, lemon juice, oregano and salt.
  • Heat a cast iron or non-stick pan over medium heat; add about ½ tablespoon of butter and swirl it around to coat the pan as it melts.
  • Cut each slice of bread into 3 "fingers"; dip each bread finger into egg mixture, turning to coat both sides evenly (don't dip more at one time than you can fit in your pan!).
  • Cook bread fingers for about 2 minutes per side until golden brown; if slices are thick enough turn them on their sides to cook briefly as well. Add more butter to pan as needed to prevent sticking when cooking subsequent batches of French toast sticks.
Serve soup with French toast sticks on the side for dipping.

Serves 4
Mountain Rose Herbs. A herbs, health and harmony c 
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Monday, March 3, 2014

Weekly Menu Retrospective #128


Welcome to my weekly roundup of the past week's eats. I prefer to report what we ate in the last week, rather than what we're planning to eat in the coming week. Why? The reason is pretty simple: although I usually have a general idea of what we're going to eat in the next week or so, life often unfolds a little differently than planned, and I adjust my menu plan on a near-daily basis to accommodate leftovers and other not-possible-to-plan-ahead circumstances. I find this is the easiest way to ensure that I minimize our family's food waste. I'm also willing to admit that I'm a rather spontaneous cook, given to preparing foods that strike me as the most appealing thing to eat right here and now!

If you'd like a whole book full of inexpensive, quick and kid-approved recipes, check out my book, Cheap Appétit : The Complete Guide to Feeding Your Family for Less Than $400 a Month (While Eating Better Than You Ever Thought Possible) on Amazon (Amazon.com, Amazon.ca and Amazon UK) and Barnes and Noble.  It's gotten multiple 5 star reviews!! I've included page references to recipes that are in the book in my menu plans so you can locate them quickly. For more details about the book, go here. 

 
Breakfasts:

Granola (p. 92), Banana Blueberry Muffins (sub blueberries for chocolate chips in this recipe, p. 96), Blueberry Clafouti (p. 223)
 
Lunches: 

leftovers, sandwiches, Meal-Sized Salads (built with random fruits, veggies, leftover tidbits, cheese, seeds, dried fruits all tossed onto a bed of greens)

Dinners:
Monday: Broccoli & Bacon Alfredo, tossed salad with honey mustard dressing

Tuesday: Sausage & Apple Sauté (p. 137)

Wednesday: Spinach & Mozzarella Egg Puff  (p. 181) 

Thursday: Pork Chops with wine jelly glaze, Skillet Millet, peas and carrots

Friday: Chicken Enchiladas (p. 127)
  
Saturday: Pasta e Fagioli (p. 168)

Sunday: Turkey Pot Pie (p. 175), mashed potatoes, roasted carrots, chocolate chip squares
 
In keeping with my local and organic challenge, I'd also like to note the local and/or organic items on this week's menu:

Organic: coconut (in granola), coconut oil (in granola), raisins, sunflower and pumpkin seeds (in granola), flax seeds, green onions, fresh ginger, garlic, lemons, coffee (locally roasted and delivered by bike!), cornstarch, mustard, tamari, oregano, basil, parsley, Fairytale tea, peppermint tea, lemon balm, oatstraw

Local: potatoes, onions, carrots, apples, salsa (home-canned), honey (unpasteurized), sour cream, whole wheat flour, sausage and ground beef (antibiotic and hormone free, pastured)
 
Local AND organic: 
oats, milk (used to make yogurt), millet, eggs (not "certified organic", but real free range and fed organic feed), apple cider vinegar

Want to know more about the specific food products I use and where I buy them? Check out my "What's In My Pantry" board on Pinterest.  I will keep this board updated with current information on what products we use, where we're buying them, and how much we're paying. It's a work-in-progress, and you can find it HERE.

For more great meal ideas, check out Menu Plan Monday at orgjunkie.com. 
Mountain Rose Herbs. A herbs, health and harmony c 
Love what you read here? Click HERE to see the ways you can help support this blog (many of them won't cost you a thing!) 

Want to stay connected in between blog posts?

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Thursday, February 27, 2014

RECIPE: Orange Cardamom Oatmeal Scones

With all due respect to last week's post on embracing these last weeks of winter, the fact that we're being offered up temperatures of -20°C in the final days of February is a little hard to take.

Orange Cardamom Oatmeal Scones to the rescue! These scones came out of the oven so fragrant that it seems tragic that you can't smell them in the photo. A bit denser than an all-flour scone, bursting with flavour from the orange and cardamom, with an extra ray of sunshine (and a bit of chewiness) from the apricots, these are just what you need to hang in there until the weather decides to hand us a warm, sunny day. Even better, these come together in next to no time, so you don't have any excuse not to whip up a batch immediately :)

I've come to the momentous decision that I'm in the "square scone" camp rather than the "pie shaped scone" camp (earth-shattering, I know). I find it easier both to shape and to eat the square ones, and they just look more robust and appealing to me somehow :) I found this method of layering the dough to give a nicely risen, pleasantly plump scone perfect for slicing in half and slathering with butter and jam. Make sure you use *cold* butter for these; you want to create little buttery pockets in the dough for maximum yumminess!

Ingredients:
1¾ cups all-purpose flour
1 cup rolled oats
¼ cup sugar
1 tsp baking soda 
1 tsp cardamom
½ tsp salt
¼ cup butter (cold, not softened)
½ cup finely chopped apricots
½ cup orange juice
¼ cup milk or light cream
1 egg
approximately 1 tbsp light cream for brushing tops

Instructions:
  • In a medium mixing bowl, combine the flour, oats, sugar, baking soda, cardamom and salt.
  • With a pastry blender, 2 forks, or your fingers, cut in the butter until crumbly (it should be in pea-sized lumps) then add the apricots
  • Beat together the orange juice, milk and egg; add to flour mixture and stir gently until a wet dough forms (it should be sticky but hold together well enough for you to pick it up in one big lump)
  • Turn dough out onto a lightly floured counter and pat it into a roughly 9" circle. Fold one side of dough in to the centre, then fold the other side completely over the top of the first (so you now have a rough log shape with 3 layers of dough)
  • Pat the dough log into a 4" x 12" shape; cut into six 2" x 4" pieces then cut each of those pieces in half to give you twelve 2" x 2" scones.
  • Place scones on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Brush tops with cream and bake at 400°F for 15 minutes or until golden brown on top.
Makes 12 scones

Mountain Rose Herbs. A herbs, health and harmony c 
Love what you read here? Click HERE to see the ways you can help support this blog (many of them won't cost you a thing!) 

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Monday, February 24, 2014

Weekly Menu Retrospective #127


Welcome to my weekly roundup of the past week's eats. I prefer to report what we ate in the last week, rather than what we're planning to eat in the coming week. Why? The reason is pretty simple: although I usually have a general idea of what we're going to eat in the next week or so, life often unfolds a little differently than planned, and I adjust my menu plan on a near-daily basis to accommodate leftovers and other not-possible-to-plan-ahead circumstances. I find this is the easiest way to ensure that I minimize our family's food waste. I'm also willing to admit that I'm a rather spontaneous cook, given to preparing foods that strike me as the most appealing thing to eat right here and now!

If you'd like a whole book full of inexpensive, quick and kid-approved recipes, check out my book, Cheap Appétit : The Complete Guide to Feeding Your Family for Less Than $400 a Month (While Eating Better Than You Ever Thought Possible) on Amazon (Amazon.com, Amazon.ca and Amazon UK) and Barnes and Noble.  It's gotten multiple 5 star reviews!! I've included page references to recipes that are in the book in my menu plans so you can locate them quickly. For more details about the book, go here. 
 
Breakfasts:

Granola (p. 92) with homemade yogurt, Carrot Raisin Bran Muffins (p. 102), Baked Oatmeal (p. 91) Fluffy Breakfast Puffs
 
Lunches: 

leftovers, sandwiches, Meal-Sized Salads (built with random fruits, veggies, leftover tidbits, cheese, seeds, dried fruits all tossed onto a bed of greens)

Dinners:
Monday: Ham & Cheese Skillet Quinoa

Tuesday: Spicy Peanut & Tomato Soup (p. 163)

Wednesday: Classic Beef Burgers (p. 125) and Easy Oven Fries (p. 194)

Thursday: Pork Souvlaki, Baked Potatoes and Greek Salad

Friday: Omelettes, hash brown potatoes, tossed salad with honey mustard dressing
  
Saturday: Apple & Bacon Baked Beans (p. 177), Cornbread (p. 212) and tossed salad with Thousand Island Dressing

Sunday: Roast chicken, mashed potatoes, gravy, roasted carrots, Raspberry Oatmeal Bars (a variation of my Easy Blueberry Oatmeal Squares)
 
In keeping with my local and organic challenge, I'd also like to note the local and/or organic items on this week's menu:

Organic: coconut (in granola), coconut oil (in granola), raisins, sunflower and pumpkin seeds (in granola), flax seeds, spelt bran, quinoa, green onions, bananas, fresh ginger, garlic, lemons, coffee (locally roasted and delivered by bike!), cornstarch, mustard, tamari, oregano, basil, parsley, Fairytale tea, peppermint tea, lemon balm, oatstraw

Local: potatoes, onions, carrots, apples, salsa (home-canned), honey (unpasteurized), sour cream, whole wheat flour, ground beef (antibiotic and hormone free, pastured)
 
Local AND organic: 
oats, milk (used to make yogurt), cornmeal, eggs (not "certified organic", but real free range and fed organic feed), apple cider vinegar

Want to know more about the specific food products I use and where I buy them? Check out my "What's In My Pantry" board on Pinterest.  I will keep this board updated with current information on what products we use, where we're buying them, and how much we're paying. It's a work-in-progress, and you can find it HERE.

For more great meal ideas, check out Menu Plan Monday at orgjunkie.com. 
Mountain Rose Herbs. A herbs, health and harmony c 
Love what you read here? Click HERE to see the ways you can help support this blog (many of them won't cost you a thing!) 

Want to stay connected in between blog posts?

Click HERE to sign up for my Cook with Karen newsletter (max 2 emails a month)

Click HERE to follow me on Pinterest 

Click HERE to follow me on Twitter

Click HERE to like Abundance on a Dime on Facebook and get updates and tips on living frugally

Click HERE to like Cheap Appétit on Facebook and get updates and tips on frugal eating and cooking
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